Studio / statement

 "Like a mirror, water seductively reflects the sky or heavens above, similarly in Choi's work, the presence of the viewer elegantly commands attention and observation."

The enigma of color, sensation, and paradox:

Finding inspiration from the physical and metaphysical qualities of water, I paint with pigmented resin. The phenomenon and sensation of color is what ultimately drives my work. My intention is not a literal representation of natural elements. Instead, I use these references to point toward spiritual notions of purity, cleansing, and beauty.

And in my recent Mylar series, color illuminated by reflection, along with mylar's unpredictability of forms, whether subtle or overt, is appealing because it provides me many avenues to explore my interest in luminous color, resulting in the fusion and blurring of lines between a painting and object. Pouring thin veils of pigmented resin, floating one atop another is a method I employ to achieve that "perfect pitch" or resonance, like a note on a scale. Often sanding in between layers is necessary to reduce the intensity of color or mass of the epoxy.

The reflective Mylar magnifies color and creates a virtual space by bouncing light back to the viewer depending on the intensity of light passing through the resin; doubling the effect and luminosity. The result is a metaphysical collapse and paradoxical expansion of space into a single moment. Similar to a hologram, the illusion of three dimensional space is not clearly defined, instead it shifts as a myriad of volumes, distorted by viewing the painting from different angles. This "inner reality" seemingly expands or contracts as the viewer moves around the work, fusing the internal with the external.

The process of selecting colors and parameters of my work is balanced by the quick decisions necessary when working with resin. Since the material dries quickly, the medium stimulates an impulsive drive, facilitating an intuitive response that flows from within and becomes an innate response with no predetermined end.

"You see what happens, and you accept what happens" - Michael Venezia